Mission

Our mission is to help our neighbors with sustainable, nutritious food supplies. To fulfill what Jesus said "Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me" Matthew 25:40

Siskiyou named "hungriest county" in both California & Oregon

Feeding America recently released a study of the most food insecure counties in the nation. This got the attention of Jefferson Public Radio, who invited us to participate in The Jefferson Exchange on Monday, May 15th. Listen to our interview! 


We exist to raise awareness of local hunger and bring change to the lives of those we serve in South Siskiyou County. With your help we can make a difference. Our website furthers our mission by providing ways for you to learn more and get involved. Thanks for visiting. Your support is appreciated.

Our pantry is located at:

Weed Elementary School Annex

780 S. Davis Avenue, Weed CA


Open Wednesdays from 11am to 3pm (EXCEPT NOVEMBER 22nd, 2017)

Clients new to our services should bring:

  • Photo ID
  • Proof of residence in South Siskiyou County (for all household members)
  • Proof of income
  • Willingness to volunteer 2 hours of help during the year

 


3 Important Snow Safety Tips

Winter officially begins on December 21, but many people across the country have already felt its wrath. Wintry weather means more dangerous conditions for driving, bicycling and even walking. Unfortunately, emergency room visits—related to snow and ice accidents—spike during December and January. Take extra precaution before venturing into the risky weather conditions. Here are tips to be safe this winter for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists:

Pedestrians—Dress for the weather: gloves, scarves, heavy-duty socks and boots, coat and hat. Walk slowly and carefully. Be aware of ice on sidewalks and give yourself plenty of time to get where you need to go. Because of the sun rays reflecting on snow, protect any visible skin with sunscreen and protect your eyes with sunglasses. Avoid walking at night, if possible.

Cyclists—Avoid cycling directly on snow or ice; wait for clearing or melting. Check your gears and brakes for ice and dirt before traveling outside. Always watch for black ice, a thin and clear sheet of ice that is especially dangerous because it looks like dry pavement.

Motorists—Only drive if necessary. Slow down and keep a safe distance in relation to other motorists. Keep your gas tank full, and scrape all the snow and ice from your vehicle’s hood, roof, windows and lights before driving. Lastly, always be aware of black ice and other hazardous road conditions.